Who are Greeks
Author: Igor Pirnovar

Introduction

Pelasges or True Pelasges

Dorians

Macedonians (Veneti)

Asia Minor

Different views and prospectives

Official Greek view about who Greeks are
Ancient Greek view about themselves
What can we discover from Greek Mythology
How do historians view this question
How do politicians treat the question
Can we arrive at an objective view

 


Introduction

Though it may look to you as a quiz question, it is far from it - to ask who are Greeks is for some a provocative question, nevertheless, I believe is an important one, because the answer the traditional historians and linguists, and in particular the Hellenists are providing us with is not only hard to believe, it plainly is an incorrect one. I believe, many chapters in traditional history including most of the timetables are wrong because nobody from the well recognized and established academics ever questioned or at least tried to verify that certain things as stated about Greeks, their language and their history do not stand a chance to pass the simplest scrutiny. Perhaps, this is not really true, because those who did try either are no longer quite so recognized and established anymore, but many have simply abandoned the idea precisely because of what happened to their sceptic colleagues.

 

Pelasges or "True Pelasges"

The traditional historians blindly accepted from Greek Hellenists the notion of the prehistoric nation in Peloponnese to be the one first encountered in Greek mythology, namely the so called "Pelasges". Nobody ever cared to investigate this issue much further. Where did the Pelasges came from. As it turns out they arrived to Greece as well, only the time table of their arrival is shifted for a few millennial into the past, hence the apparent arrival of Greeks, or whoever they were still can be dated soon after 2000 BC.

It was widely accepted that the Pelasges, as proposed by the Hellenists and traditionalists, were indeed a non -Indoeuropean nation, since they used to live in what we today call Greece, before the first arrival of Indoeuropeans. Arrival of Indoeuropean Greeks onto Peloponnese is an oxymoron, since Greeks never existed before the times Indoeuropeans arrived to Greece. They of course were not Greeks at all, how could they be? We are exploring this issue thoroughly in many places in the chapters and articles dealing with Greeks.

It is very unfortunate, that all academic establishments subscribe to the above idea, since there is much evidence, that these Pelasges indeed were Indoeuropeans, moreover Veneti. To avoid the confusion which Pelasges we mean, those of the traditionalists or the ones I claim were Indoeuropeans we will call the ones related to Venets "True Pelasges".

 

Dorians

In accordance to the the Hellenists and traditionalists Greeks have arrived into Peloponnese in two waves, and apparently both came from the north. The 1st was soon after the beginning of the second millennial (1900 BC) and the second soon after the Trojan war in the 12th century BC. This 2nd wave according to them was a Dorian invasion. As we will see, it is highly unlikely it ever took place, let alone from the north from the Balkans as some would like to have us to believe. This Dorian invasion is an enigmatic event in Greek history. Nobody seems to know exactly where the Dorian tribe came from. They are thought to have come from the north and to be named after Doris, a small area in the middle of Greece, where no Dorians lived. They settled on the south and east coast of the Peloponnese, on the southwest point of Anatolian peninsula (that was also called Doris) and on the nearby islands such as Rhodes, as well as Crete. On the map the Dorian territories era are indicated in red.

Dorian invasion
Dorians on the south apparently pushed 
                barbarians from the north
Dorians on the south apparently pushed barbarians from the north

In the middle of the Peloponnese lay Arcadia (yellow) where an old Mycenaean dialect was still spoken, just as on Cyprus, where many old traditions were carried on for a long time. However, Arcadia was not conquered by the Dorians. Neither was Athens. Athens was a Ionian city. The North -Western Greeks lived on the mainland, the island of Odysseus (Ithaca or Cephallenia) and in the northwest of the Peloponnese, up to the river Alpheios, on which Olympia (of the Olympian Games) lay. The Dorian invasion was perhaps part of great migration in which the so-called Sea Peoples tried to invade Egypt. There is still a lot of mystery about this migration, but some facts have been established or guessed. Apparently at that time several peoples, among them Brygesthe founders Phrygians, migrated from the Thrace in the north -west to Anatolia, who presumably were pushed into the motion by the "imaginary" Illirians. (As you can see, the northern movement of peoples is designed to make a case for the very questionable barbarian pressure from the Balkans.)

The "Sea Peoples" probably came from southern Anatolia, where some think, they may have been driven away by the peoples who came from the north. There was also a famine. Such a sequence of events, though, is more than unlikely, because the so called "Sea Peoples" were a rather formidable military power, and it is quite silly to believe, that s bunch of famine struck migrants could have effected them. Besides, there couldn't have been sufficient number of them to conquer south as well as north Anatolia, where they apparently established Phrygian state. Or perhaps all of these is just not possible at all and the migration from the north may be just a wishful thinking. May be a combination of all these things is more plausible. Nevertheless, the distribution of the Dorians on the southern islands and only the tips of Peloponnese is a credible argument for our theory of the nation of "Sea Peoples" to be a mixture of different peoples from North Africa, particularly skilled monument builders and Pharaoh grave robbers from Egypt, exiled Hittite rebel vassal kings with their supporters from western Anatolia, East Aegean - particularly independent trouble makers who constantly annoyed Hittites, "Ahhiyawa", as well as from trouble makers from Anatolia proper, with some traces pointing even Scynthians and Gasga or Kaska people as well as to Indians from India proper.

So theoretically it is not unreasonable at all to think that the Dorians came from the north. However, one look at the map shows that this is really quite unlikely. If they came from the north, why did they settle on the east and south coast of the Peloponnese and ignored everything else they passed through? And why were they called after that little area Doris in the middle of Greece, where they never lived? I'd expect there should be a better explanation?

 

Macedonians (Veneti)

 

Asia Minor

 

Different views and prospectives

 

Official Greek view about who Greeks are

 

Ancient Greek view about themselves

 

What can we discover from Greek Mythology

 

How do historians view this question

 

How do politicians treat the question

 

Can we arrive at an objective view

 


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©2005 Igor H. Pirnovar
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